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A Hipnosis Session with Makoto Yabuki

Author: Luisa Bernal

Section: LAB

Date: 04.2011

 

There are artists who make work concentrating on its aesthetic value, artists who create controversy, artists who follow a trend… and then there are artists who give shape to their own personal universe and generate something that most likely no-one else would have ever made reality. Japanese artist Makoto Yabuki forms part of this last category.

Yabuki began his career as a visual designer in 1997 and six years later he became artistic director of one of the most well-known visual design companies: TANGRAM.co.lt. The artistic quality of his video works is backed up by awards from festivals such as Siggraph, Art Futura, Onedotzero and Ars Electronica.

It’s hard to find much more information on this artist beyond these brief presentation details. However, it’s very easy to come across his art, and that’s perhaps a sign that his works say a lot more about this inventor of paradises where the law’s of gravity do not apply.

His project Faces (from which I have chosen the two examples: “mask” and “mirror”) offer a compendium of some of the constants

 

Faces_mask I Dresslab

 

present in his work: a blurring of the lines between analogue and digital, three-dimensional geometric forms and bulky accessories which he combines with the models, who pose as though it were a fashion photo shoot….

 

Faces_mirror I Dresslab

 

Perhaps it’s his series Syn that let’s us discover his darker side,

 

syn2-3 I Dresslab

 

but in compensation he offers us the evocative White Box, in which the famous blank page every artist has to face turns into a box full of possibilities to discover. Once over the initial block, Makoto is able to bring three dimensions to the abstract drawings that spring from his pencil. In a moment of inspiration, his geometric shapes take over everything and finally become recognizable objects until he manages to give the white box it’s place in history.

 

 

Unlike the video work As One, in addition to the piece’s visual beauty we can appreciate his ability to create a story, from the original idea, and its development to an ending.

 

 

Confine(s) subtly demonstrates another side of the artist: while keeping the volatile and geometric aspect of the elements, his recurring concentric circles and winding movements; introducing a comic element through its main character easily associated with some of the dolls created by the famous Murakami…

 

 

There’s still a lot left to discover by this Japanese artist. We’ll have to keep on the trail of his inspirational works which will carry on making us float.

 

+ info: Makoto Yabuki

 

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